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Dec, 2003

Dec 29, 2003                 

This week's proverbs are selected from Annetta Miller, Sharing Boundaries: Learning the Wisdom of Africa (Nairobi: Paulines Publications Africa, 2003). Proverbs are not given in the original languages in this book, and in many cases the language of origin is not identified. Each proverb is amplified by a short poem in blank verse based on a personal experience of the author.

Praise and truth are revealed slowly (Ethiopia).

To give to your friend is not to cast away; it is to store for the future (Swahili).

We dance, therefore we are (unknown).

If birds travel without coordination, they beat each others wings (Swahili).

There is always room for the people you love, even if the house is crowded (Tanzania).

Dec 22, 2003                 

This week's proverbs are selected from W. H. Sanders, A Collection of Umbundu Proverbs, Adages and Conundrums, included on the African Proverbs CD. Umbundu is a major language in Angola.

Ca pata usitue, ocilala ci sule.
Relatives are a better defense than a fortress.
Ci linga usumba osanji yi ci.
A fowl shuns the poisonous worm.

Cimenemene nji ka tiava. Omene hati, Si ka tiava vali. Kalunga wa tiava kuale.
In cold daybreak he wills to get firewood. After sunrise he changes his mind saying, "Sending forth the sun, Kalunga has supplied the fuel."

Epuku liocili te eli lioku pukula Suku.
God’s displeasure is the serious thing; that of others can be endured.

Etumba we lilonga halio liu ku lia.
He is frying in his own fat [his own bad habits].

Dec 15, 2003                 

This week's proverbs are all selected from Isabella Mokitimi, The Voice of the People: Proverbs of the Basotho. They come from the Sesotho language spoken in Lesotho and South Africa.

Do not open the mouth of a snake to see its teeth.

The horse has four legs but still falls sometimes.

The beast of burden will die but its harness remains [a person may die but someone still has to do his/her work].

The last quail to fly is the one struck by the hunting sticks.

A person who roasts a locust does not blink [lest it burn and become inedible].

Dec 8, 2003                 

This week's proverbs are all selected from Ryszard Pachocinski, Proverbs of Africa: Human Nature in the Nigerian Oral Tradition. The language is given after each one.

When the soup sours, the orphan gets an unusually large amount (Igbo).

What an elder can see while sitting, a child cannot see while standing (Kambari).

Having little knowledge is like having your hands tied around your neck [like a slave] (Hausa).

Look for a black goat while it is still daytime (Igbo).

One's character is just like any writing on a stone [it is obvious] (Jaba).

Nov, 2003

Nov 23, 2003                 

This week's proverbs are selections from "Wit and Wisdom of Ethiopia" Compiled and Presented with Introduction, Annotations by Negussay Ayele.

Being a burglar with a cough and supplicating to God with a grudge in the heart are not productive.

Genuine love and friendship is like hot charcoal that is covered by ashes; when you return back to it much later and poke it a little it is rekindled and reactivated anew.

Wealth usually comes in walking but exits running.

When your eyes are poked your grip on someone’s throat loosens.

One’s name remains above the grave.

Nov 16, 2003                 

This week's proverbs are selections from "Wit and Wisdom of Ethiopia" Compiled and Presented with Introduction, Annotations by Negussay Ayele.

Kindness with words is as readily available as goods in the market.

It is foolhardy to climb two trees at once just because one has two feet.

To fight with everyone can result in shortage of pallbearers at your funeral.

Vast differences among people are in the realm of character, not anatomy.

Work very hard at what you do; dine as well as you can afterwards.

Nov 9, 2003                 

This week’s proverbs are selections from original field research by Lucas Bambo on behalf of the African Proverbs Project and have never been published in print. The entire Northern Sotho Proverbs collection is are available on The African Proverbs CD.

Bophelo ke molaetsa. Thee letsa.
Life is a message. Listen to it.
Bophelo ke kalafo. Ea mogele.
Life is a treatment. Accept it.
Bophelo ke mathomo. Bo thome.
Life is a foundation. Start it.
Bophelo ke thuto. Tswelelela.
Life is education. Carry on.
Bophelo ke tumelo. Tshepa.
Life is a belief. Trust it.
Bophelo ke lerato. Nagana ka lona.
Life is love. Think about it.
Bophelo ke mpho. E a mogele.
Life is a gift. Accept it.
Bophelo ke mosomo. O sumise.
Life is a work. Use it.
Bophelo bo bo hlokwa. Hlokomela.
Life is an adventure. Dare it. bvyhb
Bophelo ke bohloko.

Nov 2, 2003                 

This week’s proverbs are selections from original field research by Lucas Bambo on behalf of the African Proverbs Project and have never been published in print. The entire Northern Sotho Proverbs collection is are available on The African Proverbs CD.

Ngwana a ka feta gare ga molete wa tau.
A child can pass through a lion’s hole.
Expl: Even if you are old, listen to the children. Maybe the clue will be there.

Ditoro dika no bolelwa, fela dika sebontshe.
Dreams can be told but not acted. It is sometimes easy to say a thing, while you can’t do it.

Monna o swanetse go dula a thabile gore a kgone go soma ga botse.
Man must always be happy in order to perform well.

Le ge e kaba mang le mang o ka sehlogele kgomo ya gago e subelela ka lerageng.
No matter who you are you will never let your cow sink into the mud.
Expl: No time to rest. Everyone must look after his children.

Modumo wa ngwana o monnyane o kwagala gabotse ko legodimong. The sound of a small baby can be heard easily in heaven.

Oct, 2003

Oct 26, 2003                 

Mwela ke bamukwata na maboko ne.
Wind is never caught by hand.
Explanation: You can never recall your words, once they are out.

Bufumu bwa bowa mukoto.
The kingdom of the mushroom is the stem.
Explanation: A chief is important because of his people.

Kuja kwa lubilo kulengela kwishipawila.
To eat with speed causes one to spit out continuously.
Explanation: It is not good to criticize a person until you know all of the facts.

Lufu Iwapichile kale nangwa bakubuIe lelo ke lube bulanda ne.
The death that passed already, even if they tell it to you today does not cause sorrow.
Explanation: When you mourn someone's death, you are really mourning your own (future death).

Kyaje wa nzolo inge wakokola mwipayai.
If a hen crows, kill it.
Explanation: Avoid proud women.

Oct 19, 2003                 

This week's proverbs are selections from "Wit and Wisdom of Ethiopia" Compiled and Presented with Introduction, Annotations by Negussay Ayele.

He who eats alone dies alone – without mourners.

Your close friend can be your worst enemy and vice versa.

What do eyes and friendship have in common? Minor incidents can damage both.

A mother’s womb is technicolor; it gives birth to any kind and character of children.

One does not forego sleeping because of the possibility of nightmares.

Oct 12, 2003                 

This week’s proverbs are selections from “Kaonde Proverbs” by Fr. John C. Ganly, M.M., as reprinted on the African Proverbs CD.

Kuzhima kwa mukovu kana tu ne kacheche kantu. To take away a scar, you can't, except with a little thing.
Explanation: If you have offended someone, you must pay them something, no matter how small, in order to be reconciled.

Mpuku inge watwela mu bwina bwa mfuko kuvulañanyako.
If a mouse enters into the hole of a mole, forget about it.
Explanation: You don't expect to win a case in someone else's village.

Muzhi ye batwa bufuku kikoo.
A village in which grain pounding is done at night is a strong whistle.
Explanation: If people prepare their food at night (because they don't want to share it) it means they have a famine.

Lonzhi wa kukokela mukoyo uchibika.
A rope which is pulled for a long time, breaks.
Explanation: If you continue to provoke someone, you are sure to make him erupt in anger.

Mukola kuzhika mambo a nsulo.
A river is deep because of the source.
Explanation: One should respect parents and elders because they are the source of our life.

Oct 05, 2003                 

This week's proverbs are selections from "Wit and Wisdom of Ethiopia" Compiled and Presented with Introduction, Annotations by Negussay Ayele.

Better a single decision maker than a thousand advisors.

Half of one’s strength in conflict situations is one’s verbal skills.

A tune is made meaningful by lyrics; a point is elucidated by analogies and idioms.

As the chimp gets higher and higher climbing the tree it exposes its unflattering behind.

The horse can take you to the battlefield but cannot do the fighting for you.

Sep, 2003

Sep 28, 2003                 

Kwenda kwa kolokofwa ne nzubo yanji.
The journey of a snail and its house.
Explanation: Wherever a wise man goes, he goes with his wisdom.

Kukwata mulwanyi ku mubenza.
To catch an enemy is to stalk him.
Explanation: You must be patient to solve a case or a problem.

Muvumbo wa kañonyi ye witubula kajo ko aja.
The beak of the bird is what tells us the things it eats.
Explanation: Your words reveal the kind of person you are.

Inge wakeba kwipaya ñwena bukiji wajizha jike janji.
If you wish to kill a crocodile, quickly rap on its egg.
Explanation: If you wish to see how someone will react to you in a fight, strike his children.

Muzhi wa mpazhi ke batungilapo ne.
They do not build in the red ant's village.
Explanation: People like to live in a peaceful village, not a troublesome one.

Sep. 21, 2003                 

This week's proverbs are selections from "Wit and Wisdom of Ethiopia" Compiled and Presented with Introduction, Annotations by Negussay Ayele.

An aging man gets closer to his land and an aging husband closer to his wife.

It is not becoming to uncover one's behind to cover the face.

Because he hardly closes his mouth the fool's teeth suffer from frost.

Kinship is like the scales; it keeps one on balance.

The coin of love has two sides: to love as one knows how or wishes to love and even better, to love as one's lover wishes to be loved.

Sep. 14, 2003                 

This week’s proverbs are selections from “Kaonde Proverbs” by Fr. John C. Ganly, M.M., as reprinted on the African Proverbs CD.

Kutobala kwa buki muntu wafwijile mu lupako.
The sweetness of the honey; a person dies in a hole in the tree.
Explanation: Don't stay where you aren't wanted.

Kunanga kwa kumakya kusambakana banyama.
To hunt in the morning is to meet animals.
Explanation: If you wish to complete your work you must begin early.

Muvumbo wa kañonyi ye witubula kajo ko aja.
The beak of the bird is what tells us the things it eats.
Explanation: Your words reveal the kind of person you are.

Nyama ya nzolo kutama kumulubankanya kuteka.
The meat of a chicken is bad only when it is cooked badly.
Explanation: Every thing is good when it is used properly.

Wabelamina mu bwina bwa muma.
You have lain in wait in an old hole (where the mice or moles no longer live).
Explanation: Why waste your time talking to an unreasonable person

Sep 7, 2003                 

This week’s proverbs are selections from “Kaonde Proverbs” by Fr. John C. Ganly, M.M., as reprinted on the African Proverbs CD.

Kiswa inge kyafika ne ku nzubo mujilo pa kumuzhima kyakatazha bingi. The tall grass if it reaches over your house, it is very hard to quench the fire.
Explanation: Prevention is better than cure.

Boya bwa kibambale bubabana tu bonse.
The hair of a hairy caterpillar, all of it causes itching.
Explanation: One wrong-doing in a village involves everyone.

Kwenda kwa kolokofwa ne nzubo yanji.
The journey of a snail and its house.
Explanation: Wherever a wise man goes, he goes with his wisdom.

Banyike kukutemwa paji to wibapa.
The children, to like you, there are some things which you give to them.
Explanation: You can tell if a house is good if a lot of children are playing around it.

Kukwata mulwanyi ku mubenza.
To catch an enemy is to stalk him.
Explanation: You must be patient to solve a case or a problem.

Aug, 2003

Aug 31, 2003                 

This week’s proverbs are selections from “Kaonde Proverbs” by Fr. John C. Ganly, M.M., as reprinted on the African Proverbs CD.

Ngulube kyenda minyinya, paji ne kyamuvundumuna.
When a wild pig walks in the daytime, something has caused it to leave its hiding place.
Explanation: Said, when a person who ordinarily never comes to visit or help you suddenly appears at your house. It means that "the only reason this man could be coming is to ask for help or a favour."

Muchima wa mukwenu munkundwe.
Another person's heart is a wilderness.
Explanation: You can never know what the other person is really thinking or feeling.

Kipungulu wapakalala ka, ami napakalala byambo. Owl, why are you so quiet? I am quiet because of words.
Explanation: When one is quiet, it is usually because something is on his mind.

Bichi bikala pamo, byo bishenkana.
Adjacent trees, it is those whose branches rub against each other.
Explanation: Two people who are together frequently, inevitably quarrel.

Ñoma yalunga yo isabika.
The drum that beats well is the one that breaks.
Explanation: Leaders do not live long because people kill them out of jealousy.

August 24, 2003                 

This week’s proverbs are selections from “Kaonde Proverbs” by Fr. John C. Ganly, M.M., as reprinted on the African Proverbs CD.

Pekala bakulu, kechi pechika muto ne.
Where there are old people, the soup will not be poured out (thrown away).
Explanation: The old people have the wisdom to solve problems.

Bikondama kuya nshiku bikoloka.
All bent things, as days go by, will be straightened.
Explanation: Time heals all wounds.

Misongo ya ngandu iyuka kyovwe mobendela.
The pains of the crocodile are known only to the hippopotamus with whom he travels.
Explanation: Be careful of interfering with another person's business.

Meno bikupa.
Teeth are merely bones.
Explanation: Just because a person is smiling doesn't mean that they don't have troubles.

Pafwa bichi pashipa mabula.
Dying trees spit out leaves.
Explanation: No leader is irreplaceable, i.e., you can always find a successor.

Aug 17, 2003                 

This week's proverbs are selected from "Luganda Proverbs" by Ferdinand Walser as reprinted on the African Proverbs CD.

Agenda ewaabwe: tazibirirwa budde.
One who goes back to his home: does not consider the night too dark. He knows his way.

Akaganda akatono: kakira mukwano (or: kakira ekkwano eddene).
Relationship, even remote: is better than friendship. Friendship may cease altogether, but relationship remains. - "Blood is thicker than water".

Akakadde ak'obuggya: amaggwa gakafumita emirundi ebiri.
The old fellow full of envy: the thorns (on the road) pierce him twice. After the first time he does not remove the thorns from the path, because he wishes others to step on them; the second time he forgets that he left them there and steps on them again.

Akamegga enjovu: kenkana we!
A thing that causes an elephant to fall: how small may it be! It is not strength (bulk), but cleverness that beats the mighty.

Akasanke kafunyirira zirwana.
The little "kasanke" (small red finch) encourages the fighting cocks (in order to get feathers for its nest).

Aug 10, 2003                 

This week’s proverbs are selected from “Swahili Proverbs from East Africa” [Methali KiSwahili Toka Afrika Mashiriki ] by Leonidas Kalugila, reprinted on the African Proverbs CD.

Majuto hayatangulii.
Remorse never comes first.

Moja moja ni fungu kubwa.
One repeatedly is a big bunch.

Siri ni kwa mtu mmoja.
A secret belongs to one person.

Usigonge nguzo ukasingizia giza.
Don't blame the darkness if you bump into a pole.

Yai haliatamii kuku.
An egg never sits (as a hen does when she has eggs) on a hen (i.e. a child is not greater than its parents).

Aug 3, 2003                 

This week’s proverbs are selected from “Swahili Proverbs from East Africa” [Methali KiSwahili Toka Afrika Mashiriki ] by Leonidas Kalugila, reprinted on the African Proverbs CD.

Anayechanja kuni akieleka, atachanjiwa.
She who fetches firewood with the child on her back will have someone fetch firewood for her.

Asiyeonyeka alipanda mtumbui wa mfinyanzi.
He who did not listen to a warning rode in a boat made of clay.

Kisichoua mchungaji hakiui ng'ombe wote.
That which does not kill a shepherd never kills the whole herd.

Kutangulia sio kufika.
To be the first at the beginning is not to be the first to reach the spot.

Majembe yalimayo pamoja hayakosi kugongana.
Hoes that dig together never miss to knock at one another (i.e. people who stay or work together sometimes quarrel).

July, 2003

                

 

July 27, 2003                 

This week's proverbs are selected from "Swahili Proverbs from East Africa" [Methali KiSwahili Toka Afrika Mashiriki ] by Leonidas Kalugila, reprinted on the African Proverbs CD.

Aachaye kweli huirudia (m.y. Afanyaye mema mahali fulani arudipo hupokelewa vizuri).
He who leaves truth behind, returns to it (i.e. a person who does something good somewhere, when he comes back people receive him/her with gladness).

Afadhali akutembeleaye kuliko akutumiaye salaam.
The one who visits you is better than the one who sends you greetings.

Afadhali kuaibika kuliko kufa (Bukoba).
Better ashamed than dead (Bukoba).

Afadhali kufa kuliko kuaibika (Karagwe).
Better dead than ashamed (Karagwe).

Afadhali kuwa jirani wa mbuga kuliko kuwa jirani wa mwenye mdomo mrefu.
It is better to be a neighbour of a field than to be a neighbour of one who speaks badly.

July 20, 2003                 

This week's proverbs are selected from "Luganda Proverbs" by Ferdinand Walser, reprinted on the African Proverbs CD.

Abafugibwa ngabo: atannagikwatamu ye agitenda obwangu.
Those who are ruled are like the shield: who never got hold of it, thinks it light. Those who don't rule think ruling is easy.

Akamwa k'omuntu: si ka nte.
A man's mouth: is not a cow's mouth (which ruminates).

Amagezi nsejjere: buli efuluma emmula bwayo.
Wisdom is like termite-hills: each one puts out new earth in its own way. Men have their own ways, their own ideas and purposes.

Atamukutte: y'agamba nti "mutenge, tugende!" (or: nti "megga, tugende!").
The one who is not wrestling: says "throw him and let us go". It is easier to give advice than to carry it out.

Atasaba taweebwa: enkoko oluba okunywa amazzi ng'eralamira waggulu.
One who does not ask, does not receive: when the chicken is drinking water, it lifts its head to heaven. Even the chicken prays.

July 13, 2003                 

This week's proverbs are selected from "Ethiopian Wisdom - Proverbs and Sayings of the Oromo People" by George Cotter, Volume 1 of the African Proverbs Series edited by John S. Mbiti as reprinted on the African Proverbs CD.

"Annaatu du-e jedhe / kan thuutho ijolle fithe."
"I am dying of hunger," said the one who finished the child's bottle."
Explanation: A great problem can reduce a person to shameful deeds. (Disgrace, Need)

"Darbatani jinfu hinqabatani."
"After you throw the spear, you cannot catch the end of it."
Explanation: One cannot undo something though one regrets having done it. (Acceptance, Regret)

"Kan qabbanaauf harka / kan houf fal-aana."
"For what is cold, the hand; for what is hot, the spoon."
Explanation: There's always a way to handle something. (Tact)

"Kophaan / udaan tchaala dansa."
"Being alone is only good for going to the toilet."
Explanation: It is good to have friends and companions. (Friendship)

"Maqmaaqsi tokko tokko dubbi fida / tokko tokko dubbi fitha."
"Some proverbs bring a quarrel; and others finish a quarrel."
Explanation: Proverbs are helpful when used properly; otherwise they cause problems. (Carefulness, Proverbs)

July 06, 2003                 

This week's selection of proverbs is taken from "Swahili Proverbs from East Africa" (Methali KiSwahili Toka Afrika Mashiriki) by Leonidas Kalugila, reprinted on the African Proverbs CD.

"Hakuna ukuu wa kunguru panzi zikianguka."
"Raven's age matters not when there are grasshoppers."

"Hata paka ana visharubu."
"Even a cat has whiskers." (i.e. Having whiskers is not a guarantee of masculinity.)

"Hebu kiishe, huchoma mkia."
"He who waits until the whole animal is visible spears its tail."

"Kiaribucho urafiki ni kukopa na kuazima."
"That which spoils friendship is borrowing and lending."

"Palipofia ndege hapakosi manyoya."
"Where a bird died there are always feathers."

June, 2003

June 29, 2003                 

All proverbs are from the book "The Voice of the People; Proverbs of the Basotho" by 'Makali I. Mokitimi, Volume 4 in the African Proverbs Series edited by John S. Mbiti, reprinted on the African Proverbs CD.

"Khomo Molimo o nko e metsi."
"The cow: God with a wet nose."
Expl: The importance of a cow to a Mosotho is seen to be like the importance of God to the people, because God gives people life. For their livelihood, the Basotho depend on the many uses of cattle.

"Khotso, pula, nala."
"Peace, rain, prosperity."
Expl: When there is peace and rain people live happier because they will not be fighting; they will plough their fields and will have food.

"Ho tsoala ke ho epa thaba."
"To give birth is to dig a mountain."
Expl: Children are wealth to a family.

"Tlala e lala tlas'a sesiu."
"Famine sleeps under the grain basket."
Expl: One never knows what tomorrow will bring.

"Seso se monate ha se ngoauoa ke mong a sona."
"A sore is soothing when it is the owner who scratches it."
Expl: Men love in themselves what they hate in others.

June 22, 2003                 

This week's selection of proverbs is taken from the book "Luganda proverbs" by Ferdinand Walser reprinted on the African Proverbs CD.

"Abangi tebawulira: wabula enkuba y'ebawuliza."
"A whole crowd does not obey: but rain makes them listen."
They run away and take shelter. It takes a powerful personality to rule a crowd.

"Abangi: tiwabula atoma (= anyiiga)."
"Where there are many: somebody will be offended."

"Abantu balamu: omwennyango bagweyokya balaba."
"People are like the stinging nettle: they get stung by it whilst seeing it."
They run into trouble with open eyes.

"Abasajja nsolo: ezimu zirya zinnaazo."
"Men are like wild animals: some eat their own kind."
Said of people who bully others: tyrants, despots, dictators etc.

"Abataka abaagalana: be balima akambugu."
"Farmers who like each other: dig up the lumbugu (grass)."
They do not quarrel about digging up the weeds on their common boundary.

June 15, 2003                 

All proverbs for this week are selections from the book, "Hearing and Keeping: Akan Proverbs" (Ghana) by Kofi Asare Opoku. This book is Volume 2 in the African Proverbs series and edited by John S. Mbiti.

"Onipa baako nsa nkata Nyame ani."
"A single hand (of a person) cannot cover the sky."
Although the Akan use the word Nyame for God who is essentially a spirit, they use the same word, on occasion, for the sky. The proverb suggests that one person’s hand cannot cover the sky, it will take many hands to accomplish that task. Cooperation and mutual help lead to the accomplishment of difficult tasks.

"Onipa ho anto no a, na efi ne nneyee."
"If a person is unhappy, the cause lies in his or her conduct."
Unhappiness in life is often caused by a person’s own conduct; and the proverb emphasizes the need for taking personal responsibility for some of life’s negative experiences, instead of putting the blame on someone else.

"Onipa a wahintiw awu no, wontutu mmirika nko n’ayiase."
"One does not run to the funeral of a person who died by stumbling over a stone."
It is important to learn from the mistakes of others (which led to injury or death) in order not to repeat them.

"Onipa fa adamfo ansa na wanya amane." "It is better for a person to make friends first before he or she gets into trouble."
In time of trouble, one may or may not know anybody but if that person had made friends earlier, they would come to help him or her. The proverb advises us not to wait till trouble comes before looking for someone to befriend so that that person can help us.

"Onipa anim nye ahina na woapun mu daa."
"The human face is not like a water-pot which should be smoked and freshened everyday."
The Akan use pots to store drinking water; and to keep the water fresh, the pot is cleaned and smoked regularly. This practice led to this proverb; for rebuking or reprimanding a person, is like washing and cleaning that person’s face. A person should therefore avoid actions which would call for rebuke everyday.

June 8, 2003                 

All proverbs are selections from the book Wit and Wisdom from West Africa compiled by Richard F. Burton. Proverbs are written in both their Ga (or Accra) and English translations respectively.

"Sikpon ko enyee gbonyo."
"No land hates a dead body."

"Ke okpongo edsim le, moni ta eno le hu edsimko."
"If the horse is mad, he who sits upon it is not also mad."

"Nu ni ake-bagbe la le, ataoole kronkron."
"Clear water is not wanted for quenching fire."

"Ake hinmeii enyo kwee to mli."
"Not with both eyes people look into a bottle."

"Adudon ni kpa gbonyo hewo le, ekele ate."
"A fly which hovers around a dead body will go with it."

June 1, 2003

This week's proverbs are selections from the book Wit and Wisdom from West Africa compliled by Richard F. Burton. Each proverb is posted with its Oji and English translations respectively.

"Wo to adur-a ebi ka w'ano."
"If you lay poison (i.e., attempt to poison others), some will touch your mouth."

"Woye abofra ensirow akotia."
"If you are a child do not deride a short man."
N.B.-Because you do not know whether you may not, when grown up, be in the same predicament.

"Akekire se, ensa ko na ensa ba."
"The tortoise says, The hand goes and the hand comes."
N.B.-Less literally, "if you draw back your hand (i.e. give me no presents), I draw back mine." It means, as you behave to me so shall I behave to you.

"Wo yem ye-a, womfa wo yirre nyke."
"If you are good-natured, you will not give away your wife."
N.B.-A good man should be thoroughly attached to his family.

"Ohia na ma odece ye akoa."
"Poverty makes a free man become a slave."

February, 2003

25 Feb. 2003                 

"The man who has bread to eat does not appreciate the severity of a famine." Yoruba proverb

24 Feb. 2003                 

"He is a fool whose sheep runs away twice." Oji (Ashanti) proverb

19 Feb. 2003                 

"Copying everyone else all the time, the monkey one day cut his throat." Zulu proverb

18 Feb. 2003                 

"Where there is no shame, there is no honor." Congo proverb

17 Feb. 2003                 

"Happiness can grow from only a little contentment." Pygmy proverb

14 Feb. 2003                 

"Always being in a hurry does not prevent death, neither does going slowly prevent living." Ibo proverb

13 Feb. 2003                 

"If you understand the beginning well, the end will not trouble you." Ashanti proverb

12 Feb. 2003                 

"When the brothers fight to the death, a stranger inherits their father's estate." Ibo proverb

11 Feb. 2003                 

"When the mouse laughs at the car, there is a hole nearby." Benin proverb

10 Feb. 2003                 

"A chattering bird builds no nest." Cameroon proverb

07 Feb. 2003                 

"Sticks in a bundle are unbreakable." Bondei proverb

06 Feb. 2003                 

"Work is the medicine for poverty." Yoruba proverb

05 Feb. 2003                 

"You are beautiful; but learn to work, for you cannot eat your beauty." Congo proverb

04 Feb. 2003                 

"The rain does not recognize anyone as a friend; it drenches all equally." Ibo proverb

01 Feb. 2003                 

"Pride only goes the length one can spit." Congo proverb



January, 2003

31 Jan. 2003                 

"One falsehood spoils a thousand truths." Ashanti proverb

30 Jan. 2003                 

"He who hates, hates himself." Zulu proverb

29 Jan. 2003                 

"Money is sharper than a sword." Ashanti proverb

28 Jan. 2003                 

"Hate has no medicine." Ghanaian proverb

27 Jan. 2003                 

"He who is guilty is the one that has much to say." Ashanti proverb

24 Jan. 2003                 

"Ingratitude is sooner or later fatal to its author." Twi proverb

23 Jan. 2003                 

"Everybody loves a fool, but nobody wants him for a son." Malinke proverb

22 Jan. 2003                 

"God! I am in your hands! What you say will happen! Nothing baffles you!" Ibo prove

21 Jan. 2003                 

"Sorrow is like rice in the store; if a basketful is removed everyday, it will come to an end at last." Somali proverb

20 Jan. 2003                 

"By the time the fool has learned the game, the players have dispersed." Ashanti proverb

17 Jan. 2003                 

"We will water the thorn for the sake of the rose." Kanem proverb

16 Jan. 2003                 

"He who treats you as himself does you no injustice." Lon proverb

15 Jan. 2003                 

"Words are sweet, but they never take the place of food." Ibo proverb

14 Jan. 2003                 

"Ndiobaga muniku." Kimbeere -- Embu Dialect (Kenya)
"I don't roast seeds."

13 Jan. 2003                 

"Ni ithiga ukwire yerie ngwenje." Kimbeere -- Embu Dialect (Kenya)
"You are telling a stone to prepare for a haircut."

10 Jan. 2003                 

"Nibubire coro na kuria kwarie." Kimbeere -- Embu Dialect (Kenya)
"You blew the flute on the wide side."

09 Jan. 2003                 

"Mwigiritania na tkwora ndaturaga ngi." Kimbeere -- Embu Dialect (Kenya)
"Whoever leans on a rotting body lacks no flies."

08 Jan. 2003                 

"Ciakuraca tricaga mburto." Kimbeere -- Embu Dialect (Kenya)
"Strangers eat keenly."

07 Jan. 2003                 

"Yakuira yuraga we kianagima." Kimbeere -- Embu Dialect (Kenya)
"A goat that is loose listens not to the voice of the shepherd."

06 Jan. 2003                 

"Gutiri umenyaga ikirwa ta akifetwa." Kimbeere -- Embu Dialect (Kenya)
"No one knows caution as regrets."

03 Jan. 2003                 

"Gutiri mwii na mucuthiriria." Kimbeere -- Embu Dialect (Kenya)
"There is no thief and tie onlooker."

01 Jan. 2003                 

"Ciutiri umenyaga kwefera atari mukune." Kimbeere -- Embu Dialect (Kenya)
"If he has never been beaten/hit."

 

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